Transitioning into Fall

As we begin to transition from Summer to Fall I bet you start to notice little differences in your life. You might feel colder, your skin might get dry, or maybe you feel like have more to do and take on in your life. You might notice other changes like the amount of sunlight and the slightly earthy smell of Autumn.  For me, I feel an increase in stress, my mood starts to shift, I feel I need to eat differently and bundle up on cool days. I see a lot of people coming down with colds and busier  schedules with school and work adds on stress.

The more we can begin to listen to and hear the subtle (and sometimes not so subtle) signals our body is telling us, we can choose to make choices that better support us and nourish us through times of transition. That might mean being consistent with your exercise routine, changing something in your diet, going to bed early and getting enough rest or finding the right teacher to guide you.

In Ayurveda the Fall is Vata season which is governed by qualities (gunas) that are dry, light, cold, rough, mobile, subtle and clear. These qualities show up in our environment, physical body, thoughts, behaviours, etc. You might experience cold as having cold hands and feet. Or rough might show up as dry, flakey skin. Mobile might show up in scattered thoughts and not being able to settle down in the evenings. When we feel balanced we embody qualities that are stable, warm, calm, grounded, soothed, nourished, peaceful and slow. Notice these qualities are the opposite of the first set.

To find a balance you don’t want more of the same. For example, if you feel cold, drinking a glass of ice cold water won’t feel nourishing. You would choose a hot tea perhaps instead or put on a pair of wooly socks. In yoga we might explore slower movement and grounding asanas like “cat/cow” and “legs up the wall” to cultivate feelings of stable and groundedness. Soft, gentle breathing or alternate nostril breathing will help calm the body and mind. Meditation and Yoga Nidra are also useful for balancing nervous and anxious (mobile) energy and generate a felt sense of peace.

Small changes can have profound effects on how you feel and how you are with a situation (like a confrontation at work). I have a tendency to have a rough/mobile mind and emotions. For me, mobility shows up as a busy mind, restlessness, anxiety, and feeling stuck in a rut. This triggers the rougher qualities like anger and irritation. The other day I was conversing with someone via e-mail and I noticed a flare of up irritation and then anger over what ended up being a misunderstanding. This was a signal for me that I was out of balance and I needed to switch gears and sit in meditation for while.  The point is, if you don’t like how you feel or how you are acting/reacting to a situation – you have the power to change it. Do something different in order to get a different outcome. If you can identify a quality of what it is you want to change, consider what the opposite quality is and see if you can play with that.

If you are interested in learning more about these qualities and how you can bring more balance to your life, let’s chat! I love yoga therapy because we can impact the body, mind, emotions and spirit through movement, breath, meditation and developing a deeper awareness of yoga philosophy and Ayurveda and it has a ripple effect to all the other areas!

A Road Map to Authentic Living

The Yamas and Niyamas are ethical guidelines or a map that help us make choices that are supportive and growth oriented. This is a two part post on how we can use these guidelines to support us in finding more ease in our lives.

According to the Yoga Sutras there are 8 branches of yoga that when practiced is designed to help the practitioner live a deeper and more fulfilled life. The Yamas and Niyamas are the first two branches, followed by asana – what we know as the yoga postures. So in sense we can think of the Yamas and Niyamas as guidelines for how to conduct our lives day to day which is more important than the physical movement practice. Asana came much later as a tool to help prepare the body for meditation.

There are 5 Yamas and 5 Niyamas. The Yamas are guidelines for how relate to our environment and other people. The Niyamas are guidelines for how we relate to ourselves.

Yamas:

  1. Ahimsa: non-violence
  2. Satya: truthfulness
  3. Asteya: non-stealing
  4. Bramacharya: non-excess
  5. Aparigraha: non-possessiveness

Today I want to explore the concepts of Ahimsa and Satya and how we might use these principles to step into a more authentic sense of being.

Ahimsa, or non-violence encompasses our ability to move through life with courage, compassion and love for ourselves and others. Satya, or truthfulness, goes intimately hand in hand with non-violence. To be truthful, asks us to live in a way where we express ourselves in a way that is real and authentic. It’s about expressing our needs in order to grow and act with integrity and purpose.

Ahimsa encourages us to be courageous, to be brave. Do something that scares you by taking a small step out of your comfort zone, in the name of personal growth. Small steps help us to grow our comfort zone while also maintaining a level of safety.  When we stay in our fear, we are small and limited, and are essentially harming our potential. Practicing compassion, forgiveness and being kind and loving towards ourselves, helps us to extend the same warmth towards others. We are really harder on ourselves than we are on our friends or family. Self-acceptance and learning to love all aspects of ourselves carries over into all other aspects of our life.

With Truthfulness we need to seek a balance between being “real” and being “nice”. We don’t have to sacrifice our needs to appear “nice” or perfect or helpful. Acting with integrity also prevents us from using our truth as a way of hurting someone else.

Satya also asks us to express ourselves. When we limit ourselves with shoulds or should nots (based on our beliefs or what we hear from others), redirects our attention to indulgence. We hide behind overworking or over-eating or over-exercising, rather than doing what we really want to do.

Satya asks us to grow! This might mean making changes to the group(s) we belong to. Look at how the environment of the people you interact with supports or conflicts with who and how you want be in the world. Speaking our truth  and acting on it, can be difficult at times. It requires courage. Sometimes the cost of our realness just seems too high. Be brave.

Have you ever had to reneg on a promise? Do you overextend yourself? Do you then avoid the person you agreed to help, because you just don’t have the time? What might life be like if you didn’t have to apologize or cancel or avoid? These things happen because we cheat the truth and then are left with messes to clean up. Being truthful with ourselves and what we can take on our plate grows us into someone who acts and speaks with integrity, someone who is reliable and trustworthy.

The compassion of non-violence keeps truthfulness from being a personal weapon. It reminds us to think about what we say and do and how it will impact those around us.

There are many ways we can use these Yamas in application to our life. We might look at these concepts and see how they show up in our lives and consider small things we can do to improve our relationships. A friend who went through a divorce last year, used the Yamas to support herself through those trying days, weeks and months. A colleague who wanted to live in a way that was more aligned with her values, use the Yamas to guide her choices. In my personal yoga therapy practice I reflect on one aspect of a Yama each week to grow my awareness and understanding of how I show up in the world so I can be more present with my family and my clients.

This week,  consider one aspect of Ahimsa or Satya that resonated with you and explore how it shows up in your life.

My Self-Care Story

Self-care is a hot topic that is getting a lot of attention in the news and social media right now. We know self-care is important but what is it really? Are you doing it right? How can you make the most of the little free time you already have? As I go through my yoga therapy studies and the evolution of my own practice my perceptions around self-care has changed and I want to share with you what I have learned.

In this blog post, I share my views on self-care, my daily routine and how I managed to have the best winter ever despite it being long, dark and cold, AND how self-care doesn’t have to be time-consuming or expensive.

This Fall I will be hosting a day-long Self-Care workshop to help you design a self-care practice that will work for your lifestyle. You will also learn how you can be accountable to maintaining a self-care program that is supportive and nourishing to YOU!

What is self-care? In my experience, self-care is going to be different for everyone. There may be some similiarities and there will certainly be differences. For me, self-care is more than checking off an action on my to-do list. It is something that is becoming a lifestyle, a series of choices that I know are nourishing and supportive. What this is for me, may be completely different for you. And it didn’t happen overnight. It was as series of choices that have evolved over time. Things taken out of my life and things added. Let me share a couple of examples. There have been some toxic relationships that I had to let go of if I wanted to thrive and have a lifestyle that was free from drama and guilt. I cut out drinking alcohol because I didn’t like how it made me feel. I thought this was going to negatively impact my social life but it only made it better. Some things I’ve added: I’ve started to include some Ayurvedic dincharya practices into my morning and bedtime routines (learn more). Some things that evolved: my diet and how I practice yoga. These lifestyle choices nourish me, they help me sleep better, I have more energy, I handle stress better, I am better at my job. What works for me, might not work for you. Let me give you an example. Some people might find that playing with or petting a dog to be extremely comforting and relaxing. They find it re-energizing and supportive. Someone who is allergic to or afraid of dogs might find petting a dog extremely agitating and therefore not nourishing or supportive. This is why we need to assess what feels good for us, what is sustainable, and what is the outcome of the self-care practices we choose.

My experience of Ayurveda and self-care began in ernest last summer. I began integrating the Ayurvedic practices of Dinaycharya that I learned in my training. I gradually introduced these practices into my daily routines, with consistency. They are now a natural and organic part of my lifestyle.  What I noticed, and what I attribute to these practices is that I had a really excellent winter.

Let me explain:

Winter has always been a troubling season for me.

I get cold and stay cold and find myself shivering all the time. Going outside is extremely uncomfortable.  My happy place is piled under blankets with an electric heating pad.

The long dark days are depressing. No amount of Vitamin D could pull me out the seasonal funk.

I had no desire to go outside, to exercise, to be social. I literally hibernate.

Winter was a real struggle that never seemed to end.

Does this sound familiar? I also worked on going to bed by 10pm each night, waking up early every morning, eating at regular times during the day – which I still find challenging.  But what I took away from these seemingly benign practices was so much more than I though was possible. We can all agree that here in Ontario we had a long, cold winter. Everyone, and I mean literally everyone complained about how terrible winter had been, how long it felt, how there was an urgency for spring for to arrive. While, yes, it was long, this was the first year I didn’t feel negatively about it. I felt like I had weathered the winter well. The snow and the cold didn’t bother me the way it had in the past. I had energy to do more things and try new stuff.  I would even go so far as to say this was the best winter I’ve experienced. When I share this, people look at me dumbfounded. I don’t have any other explanation as to why I didn’t experience all the symptoms I typically do in the winter. When I considered what I was doing differently, it was my self-care routine.

If we want to experience to a different outcome in our lives – whether it’s how we feel, the outcome of our businesses or our relationships, we have to do something differently. Same actions, same outcome. New actions, different outcome. I had no idea what the outcome was going to be. I didn’t start this self-care routine thinking it was going to make my experience of winter better. I was curious. I was willing to try something new if there was potential that it could help me feel differently and in a very general way. There is very little time spent or cost associated with these practices.

I’ve also gained a deeper understanding of how I can create balance in my life. Balance does not mean more of something and less of something else. For me, balance is the outcome of how I am able to be with a situation without being thrown out of whack. It’s about how I relate to stressor or a bad driver or a negative comment. Balance is a state of being that you can cultivate when you are nourished from the inside out.

As a result of this self-care lifestyle that I have cultivated over time,  I have more clarity and awareness around how my diet impacts different aspects of my life. While winter was wonderful for me, I found there was some struggle going into spring, which sparked a new curiosity for me. What do I need to change during the winter, to support myself going into spring? Now I get to explore. Self-care in and of itself evolves and changes over time and for me, across seasons.

Through my yoga therapy training we learn a lot about Ayruveda and how we can support ourselves. In my physical yoga practice there are practices I can do that help me feel more grounded and supported when I feel unthethered. There are practices that are energizing or calming. Movement, breathing, and meditation all factor into my lifestyle and supports and nourishes me. These might look different everyday too.

Check out my earlier blog post about Dinacharya practices. If you’re curious, pick one or two that feel like they would be easy to incorporate, notice how it feels for you and go from there. If you want to introduce a movement, breathing or meditation practice into your life, let’s talk about ways I can support you to get started.

This Fall I will be running a day long self-care workshop that will explore a variety of self-care practices that you can build into your routine that is manageable and supportive. We will create individual plans to help you measure whether or not your self-care practices are supporting you. If you are not on my mailing list and you don’t want to miss out upcoming events and new blog posts, sign up today.

 

 

Sankalpa: Connecting to your deepest hearts longing

I just spent the last 16 days in Calgary. The first few days I went up to Banff with a childhood friend and we hiked up to the tea house at Lake Agnes at 2135 metres from  Lake Louise where I got to experience snow, rain and sunshine in the course of one morning. I also got to experience the challenges of hiking at an elevation and listening to what my body needed along the way and it was speaking loudly! At higher elevations and with slippery slopes I thought my insides were going to burst! Slowly, slowly one step at a time, and with help of shoe spikes, I finally felt into the rhythm and the flow of hike. The quiet and the stillness of the mountains reminded me of that quiet space that is available in me, whenever I slow down and listen to my own natural rhythms. From lakes to hot springs to waterfalls, peaks to plateaus, the mountains were exactly what I needed and I headed back to Calgary feeling rejuvenated.

Reunited with my 11 other trainees we spent the last 9.5 days tucked away in a yoga studio where we improved our capacity to see, grew our own practice, explored the practice of Sankalpa and spent days and days learning more about Rhythmic Movement Training and integrating reflexes.

Sankalpa is easiest to explain by what it is not. It is not a desire, it is not an affirmation or an intention. It is a true statement based on ones inner nature, our deepest hearts longing. It is what we are but have forgotten. We forget our wholeness and our ability to choose. We often feel stuck in the muck of life. Sankalpa means “truth-vow” – a sacred prayer of truth of who are already. When we have a Sankalpa it can guide how we act and creates a more comfortable space for creativity and imagination to arise. It brings us into being and stillness. Described in another way, it is the coming back to source, connecting with your wisdom keeper, being in the zone. These are the places where there is clarity, seeing all the information that is there and knowing what to do. We live in a culture that values the hustle and the thinking and the doing. Sankalpa invites us to to a quieter space so we can experience freedom, authenticity, ease, power, receptiveness, openness and wisdom. Doing things that don’t align with our inner nature are depleting and energy sapping. We can build our energy reserves, or in Ayurveda, our Ojas, when we become more aligned with our true selves. We can use our Sankalpa in Yoga Nidra practice, to interrupt negative self-talk, during conflict, in meditation, or simply in the background of our day to day lives. We always have choice.

Choosing a Sankalpa could simply be:  I AM.  I AM HERE is a statement and identification of choosing to be here, now. Being present. It is a reminder that we are a body with breath, a mind with thoughts and emotions and feelings. We are not lost in the past or worried about the future. Many beautiful Sankalpas arose this last week in my group, I AM BRAVE, I AM CAPABLE OF GIVING AND RECEIVING LOVE, I AM WORTHY. If you are curious about setting your own Sankalpa, start small with what you know is true. Remember, you always have choice. ❤

 

A New Perspective on Successful New Years Resolutions

A long time ago I gave up on New Years Resolutions. They were pipe dreams with no plan, no direction. When we have big goals that we want to achieve in the year, it can actually be really overwhelming, and despite our best intentions, we end up abandoning resolutions and fall back into our familiar negative thought patterns and self-talk. Part of the problem with the word “resolution” is that it’s so negative. We resolve to give something up or take something unwanted out of our life. Starting with a mind set on the negative is setting ourselves up for failure at the outset.  We feel disconnected and thus stay disconnected from what we really want.  So, then I tried setting some intentions about what I wanted to manifest or create in my life but it still lacked direction and focus. Finally, this past year, with the help of yoga therapy I was able to gain more clarity and competency which led me to a new perspective in planning out my intentions for 2019.

This year my intention is to live with more ease. I’ve identified that to be happy, healthy and successful in my career and relationships I need to make cultivating ease a priority. I’ve asked myself, what does that look like? Sound like? Feel like? As I get really clear about what I want my day to day to be like, it gives me more information about what I need to do or stop doing in order to have that feeling. Creating ease in all aspects of my life is going to take a lot of work and a lot of courage so my strategy is “baby steps”.  Earlier in 2018 I established that In order to have more ease, I need to have a daily self-care routine. I started to slowly add to my daily practice this past summer and will continue to add and refine this year so that my self-care is a part of my lifestyle, rather than a to-do list item. I have more baby steps to take around diet, scheduling, study and work to grow the ease I experience everyday. The beauty of taking baby steps, is we start to recognize what really works for us, and what doesn’t. We gain more awareness. We can refine and adjust our course of action at any time. Success happens on a daily basis because each day is progress. A crazy out of focus week where I get off track, isn’t considered a set back. It’s a recognition that my load increased based on what was happening and it helps recognize where I need more support or where I need to build more bandwidth or stamina in my yoga practice or self-care routine.

If setting intentions are new to you, try going to a yoga class where the teacher invites you to set an intention for the hour practice. Or practice setting an intention for your day. It could be anything. In a yoga class, an intention could be paying attention your breathing, moving without pain, being open to a new perspective or noticing when negative thoughts arise. Intention setting is a skill that you practice until it becomes second nature. Let this be your first baby step.

As your new skill becomes a new habit, start incorporating something new or something more challenging until that also becomes routine. As your capacity grows, add more. If your goal is to develop a morning meditation practice, maybe you start by getting up 5 minutes earlier until it’s easy. Then add 5 more minutes and 5 more minutes. In a few months you’ll be getting up an hour earlier so you can do whatever it is you want or need to do in the morning. Building my Ayurvedic inspired self-care routine started with a couple activities that were easy and took very little time. Once those few things became established as a part of my normal routine, I was ready to add more. As I added, I also started to notice the benefits of these practices which inspired and encouraged me to do more because it brought more ease into my life.

If you want to run a marathon but have excruciating hip pain, your baby steps might include learning the habitual movement patterns that are keeping you in that cycle of pain. You might choose to work with a yoga therapist, to learn how to quiet the compensatory movements to move better. Then you’ll practice your homework to get out of pain and build stamina around your new movement patterns. Then as the pain goes away, perhaps you’ll start to run short distances that don’t increase pain. As your stamina and strength grow, you add more distance and more speed. One baby step at a time. The better you get, the better you get.

I struggled for a long time to get to the point where I could start doing the things I wanted to do and needed to do. I just didn’t have the energetic capacity to do the things in life that I wanted to do. I started working with a yoga therapist who helped me gain clarity and develop confidence and competency to be able to start taking baby steps in the direction I wanted to go. As my energy started to increase, I used my good days to do the hard things. The hard things turned into good things which increased my ease and my confidence and the better I got, the better I got. I really think that the culture of “hustling” is overrated. We push ourselves so hard because we think we have to.  I see so many people overburdened by their work, getting sick, burnt out, stressed, developing aches and pains because they are all hustle and fear of failure.  These folks no longer prioritize their health and miss out on the things they really want to do because they are doing what they think they should be doing.

We often get overwhelmed and discouraged by our  goals before we even get started. The gap between where we are and where we want to go can seem impossible to close. We also tend to have a tremendous ability to tolerate stuff because we think it’s normal or we think change isn’t possible. The truth is we can make change happen bit by bit. Sometimes we just need a little bit of support. Consider there is always another way. The work doesn’t have to be hard or time consuming. It just takes a desire and willingness to make what you are tolerating intolerable. If this resonates with you and you want support to get started, or you desire a fresh perspective on how you can break those goals into baby steps, I’m happy to help. Connect with me via email or schedule a session with me.

Part 2: Ayurvedic Self Care for Cold and Flu Season

Perhaps you’ve started to integrate some Ayurvedic self-care practices into your daily routine from Part 1 and you’re ready to add some more. Today I will share some more practices that you can build into your  evening routine for sleep hygiene and better health.

Do you find that you have a long hectic day at work and by the time you get the kids to bed all you want to do is enjoy a glass of wine and turn on Netflix? I hear ya. Even though alcohol and numbing our minds to the screen gives us immediate gratification, the effects it has on our sleep quality might not be worth it long term. Our bodies are designed to process toxins and restore our system over the course of the night so we can wake feeling rested and energized. Unfortunately for many of us, we have a hard time falling asleep and staying asleep, and wake up feeling tired and foggy. Luckily there are a few things that we can start to incorporate into our evening routine.

Ayurvedic science says that our mid-day lunch should be the largest meal of the day followed by a light walk to aid digestion. Many cultures today already do this. In the evenings, a light supper is recommended and an evening walk will help to ensure that our food is fully digested before we go to bed. This is important because we don’t want our body to have to use up all its energy to digest our food while we sleep. This takes away from the restorative functions we need for good health. So maybe start with a light, healthy dinner and a short walk. A pre-bed routine will help with ease-ful sleep. It is recommended to turn off screens at least one hour before bed to help the nervous system prepare for sleep.

If you have a hard time falling asleep and staying asleep, consider these ideas to help you sleep more restoratively, deeply and easily.

  1. Set a consistent bedtime. If you have an irregular morning schedule, go to bed 8 hours before you have to get up. Some people need more or less sleep time. Keep track of how many hours you sleep and if it feels it’s not enough, or too much adjust accordingly.
  2. Have a bed time routine. This may include other items from this list. It might include reading a book, gentle yoga, chatting with family member, washing your face, brushing your teeth or a self oil massage before you go to bed.
  3. Bedroom is only for sleep and sex (that means no TV or work). That way your body/brain can fall asleep easier.
  4. Minimize screen time before bed. Whether it is your tv, phone or other device, it provides more stimuli and can set your nervous system on high alert. It will take a longer time for your nervous system to begin to settle into the rest/digest system.
  5. Keep your bedroom dark for sleep (invest in an eye-mask and earplugs if you need to)
  6. Avoid alcohol and heavy food. As I mentioned earlier, your body has to put a lot of effort into digestion, which it shouldn’t have to do while you sleep.
  7. Enjoy a cup of warm spiced milk (nut milk is okay too!). This can aid in digestion and set the nervous system at ease.
  8. Indulge in a self foot massage with warm oil. This can help to ground and settle out any erratic energies.

A few yoga postures that I help me prepare for sleep include child’s pose, cat/cow, and legs up the wall. If I’m having a particularly hard time falling asleep I’ll listen to a Yoga Nidra recording.  Usually the hardest one to implement is the one we need to do the most. Let me know what works for you and if I can support you in any way.

In Part 3 I will share a Digestive Reset Program that I will be participating in this Fall so stay tuned!

Happy Exploring!

Source: Mona Warner, Ayurvedic counsellor, Janati Yoga

 

Part 1: Ayurvedic Self-Care for Cold and Flu Season

This blog is the first of a 3 part series on Ayurvedic self-care practices you can build into your routine for better health. In part 1 you will find morning self-care practices you can start building in your daily routine. Part 2 will discuss evening routines for a better sleep. Part 3 will have details for digestive reset program that I am participating in this Fall and I will invite you to join me.

This year it felt like Mother Nature flipped a switch and the weather changed from the hot humid summer to a cool brisk Fall. When the seasons change we are at risk for lowered immune function. I see people all around me getting colds already.

As a student and later as I began my first career as a classroom teacher I would get sinus infections like clockwork as the seasons changed. It wasn’t until I began a regular yoga practice that my nervous system started to become better regulated and my immune system became stronger and the infections stopped.

That is not to say I haven’t periodically come down with the flu or felt under the weather. As I delve deeper into my yoga therapy studies for the C-IAYT certification, I have started some new routines based on Ayurvedic science. Ayurveda is the sister science to yoga that developed thousands years ago. It is based on the belief that health and wellness depends on the balance between mind, body and spirit. Its main goal is to promote good health, not fight disease. This is a proactive approach that we can assimilate into our routines which becomes an ongoing self-care practice or lifestyle, rather than an antidote you receive in order to fix a problem. As a part of my daily routine I have started to implement some new practices. As I begin to find ease in my routine I will continue to add more and more.

Why is a daily routine so important? Without going too deeply into it, our doshas, or qualities that are inherently in us, influence our body-minds and environments in a particular way throughout the day. When we can align with the natural rhythms of the day and the natural rhythms of our body, we promote optimal health. Starting with our morning routine is a great way to begin because it sets the stage for how our day unfolds.

Our bodies naturally work to clear out excess toxins while we sleep. This is why having a full nights sleep is so important. These toxins find their way into our colon and skin which is why personal hygiene needs to be taken care in the morning. First thing when you wake up drink warm water with a squeeze of lemon, followed by elimination. My friend Shelly Prosko, a physio/yoga therapist designed a toilet mediation which I will share in a separate post.

Here are a few things you can build into your morning routine (choose 1 or 2 things then add more later). The key is to be able to create more ease and not feel overwhelmed by a to do list of things.

  1. For your Mouth:
    • Gargle: use sea salt and warm water for a sore throat or to clear the throat of potential infections. To reduce soreness or dryness use sesame oil. To reduce inflammation of the oral tissue use milk.
    • Scrape your tongue with tongue scraper or spoon: it removes accumulations from the tongue and stimulates the fire quality (that we need for energy and digestion). Rinse the mouth after to clear any residue.
    • Brush teeth: astringent, bitter or pungent tooth powder or paste are used to keep the gum tissue firm.
    • Oil pulling: the state of the mouth is thought to reflect the state of the entire gastrointestinal tract. Lubrication is of the utmost importance for a well-functioning digestive system, especially for elimination. Take tablespoon of oil (sesame for fall/winter, coconut for summer) and swish it in the mouth for 2 to 10 minutes. When I started 30 seconds was the most I could handle. It helps to strengthen gums, teeth and tongue. Reduces dryness of the lips and tongue and helps to promote elimination.
  2. For your Eyes:
    • To freshen the eyes, rinse with cool clean water or organic rose water (hydrosol).
  3. For your Nose:
    • Neti: this is my favourite part of my morning routine. This is a technique used to clean the nasal passages using sea salt, water and a neti pot. It is great to clear excess mucus from the nasal passages and sinuses. It reduces the build-up of allergens, dust and other debris in the nasal passages and promotes clear and easy nasal breathing.
    • Nasal Oleation: oiling the nasal passages helps keep them lubricated and nourished and prevents dryness. It is especially important with environmental sensitivities like animal dander and pollen. Use 2-4 drops of plain oil like sesame or coconut in your palm. Rub your pinky finger in the oil and gently swirl in your nostrils.
  4. For your Skin:
    • Dry brush: using a raw silk glove or a brush specifically designed for the body, gently brush the skin to remove any dry skin and promote lymphatic circulation. Depending on your need, it may be done daily, weekly or monthly. Brush gently over your face and genitals. Long strokes over the long bones, and circle strokes over the joints.
    • Self oil massage: a technique used to nourish and protect the skin, harmonizes the flow of energy and promotes circulation and soothes the nervous system. Depending on your need, oil massage may be done daily, weekly or monthly. Use sesame, sweet almond or jojoba for Fall/Winter. Use similar strokes to the dry brushing. Sit and breathe for a few minutes while the oil is absorbed by the skin. The skin is a very important organ of digestion therefore using organic cold pressed oil is recommended. From an Ayurvedic view, you would only put on your skin what you would put in your mouth.
    • Shower or Bath: after self oiling, a bath or shower is taken to remove excess oil before getting dressed. They are also invigorating, refreshing and release negative energy. Soap can be used for the arm pits and groin area. The remainder of the body is simply rinsed – unless there is dirt of course. Too much soap removes the natural oils that maintain the health and strength of the skin.
    • Sweat: the skin benefits from sweating daily. A little perspiration beneath the arms and at the low back – about 50% of one’s capacity. This can be done by going for a brisk walk or visiting a sauna. The intention is to liquefy any toxins and allow it to release through the open pores.
  5. For your Ears:
    • To keep the auditory passages from drying, we put a few drops of oil (sesame or coconut) into the ears by either putting oil on the pinky fingers and rotating them around the aperture or using a dropper to put 2-3 drops of oil into the ear canals. You can also oil the outer architecture of the ears if you like.

I invite you to pick one or two things to incorporate into your daily routine this week and let me know how it goes. Stay tuned for my next post on evening routines and bed time hygiene.

Happy exploring!

Source: Mona Warner, Ayurvedic counsellor, Janati Yoga

Pain and Healing – Part IV

 

Today I am reviewing the session with Dr. Tracy Jackson to discusses opioid addiction and pain. She says that anyone who experiences addiction feels a sense of isolation, feelings of failure or a need to be put their dependency in a positive light. They feel stigmatized.

When we are in pain, we are under psychological and physical duress. Our sympathetic nervous system, also known as our fight or flight system is stressed.

A big piece of the puzzle about pain is unpacking assumptions. The first and foremost is that the experience of pain can be different for everyone. Second, often times, patients are not in the doctors office long enough communicate and to be heard. You have your 10 or 15 minutes and are given medication of your symptoms. Having to go back to the doctors multiple times is inefficient and unhelpful. Third, there is little in the way of pain education in medical school. Doctors are not well versed in understanding pain.

So a part of this conference that I attended and what I am hoping to impart to you, the reader, is to empower you to understand what is going on in your body. What we do is not complicated, we just do it often, over and over again. This means we can re-train our bodies and our minds! We are incredibly resilient and the results are durable. yay! Experiencing a reduction in pain mean it can be long term (hope!) (yay!) (double yay!)

Medicine ads tell us to take this drug or that drug to keep going and enjoy life but this doesn’t address the issue or the innate intelligence of our body. While medicine can be life saving short term – it should be temporary while you learn how to retrain your body. Research findings tell us that no pill or surgery that is going to “fix” a body part that is just responding to a brain that is on high alert. We have to calm the underlying stress to be a better ______(fill in the blank).

When we feel unsafe we are pricked with the highest capacity for pain. We experience symptoms like insomnia, adrenal fatigue, depression – we are on high alert. When we feel safe we have a lower capacity for pain. We feel more energized, happy, alert, and creative – we are calm and relaxed. For someone who is diagnosed with fibromyalgia, there is a certain stigma (DIM) but at the same time, the person can feel better just from the diagnosis (SIM). Anyone can endure an illness – we want to be able to channel the “enduring” to make changes.

The challenge is that it is hard to see while in the thick of it. It takes a long time to develop pain or addiction but recovery can be quick.

If you, or someone you know has concerns for addiction, Dr. Tracy Jackson offers these steps to take:

  1. There is hope. It won’t be as bad as you think. Have compassion for yourself because relapse is high.
  2. If you are given a prescription for opioids ask for a referral for treatment.
  3. Keep trying. People are desperate to help you if you want to be helped.
  4. Mindfulness and movement are the most effective ways to cope with pain and addiction.
  5. Self-care. Put your airplane mask on first. This is the same for family members who see another family member in pain.

Opioids can actually make the experience of pain worse. Once you come off dependency, the capacity for pain will be improved and the body will function better (better immune, more energy, etc). If you are taking opioids, come up with a coping plan for withdrawal – make sure your support system is in place.

A part of the coping plan is looking at your diet. Diet is critical because there are lots of inflammatory foods that impact all of our body systems. It is also important to unplug from technology and go out in nature. The Japanese have a term called “forest bathing” for the therapeutic effects of walking and appreciating nature. Dr. Jackson also recommends at least a 150 minutes of yoga a week that is calming.

Next week, I will explore the topic of diet and gut health from the perspective of Ayurvedic medicine and how it relates to pain.

In health,

Lindsay

 

Summer Yoga Sale

It’s been a while since I’ve written anything for my blog. I’ve had a surprisingly busy summer between spending time at cottages with friends, family events and travelling to Yellowknife for a wedding. Aside from travel I’m taking two online courses for my yoga business and professional development, I’m the vice president for a Business Networking International chapter in Toronto and planning fun and creative ways to bring yoga to individuals and corporations in city. Despite it all I still manage to make time for my own daily yoga practice. Making self-care a priority means I’m physically, emotionally and mentally in a space where I can manage all the other things in my life with relative ease and minimal stress.

Many of us take longer holidays in the summer, spend more time outdoors and are more active in general. With the extra time and energy you have this summer, consider starting a yoga practice to prepare your body and mind for the changes that come in the Fall and Winter. To help you get started, this summer I am offering $60 private sessions to all new clients in Toronto until the end of August. You can add a friend for only $15 more. Whether you are looking to deeply relax, start a meditation/mindfulness practice or are looking to get out of pain or improve mobility I can customize a practice that is unique to you and give you the skills necessary to start your own home practice. Contact me today and mention this article to get the sale!

3 Easy Steps to a Personalized Home Yoga Practice this Summer

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I hear all the time, “I love the idea of practicing yoga but I just don’t have time to go to a studio. I can’t afford regular private yoga classes, how can I have a yoga practice without the cost and time commitment?”

I hear you!

Now that summer is almost here, the days are longer and we are spending more time with outdoor activities and travelling. As much as ever, it is important to dedicate certain activities to a regular routine or schedule. If yoga is on your radar as a part of your self-care this summer, I can help you get there without having to commit to regularly scheduled classes or dragging yourself away to a studio for group classes. Like any skill or good habit you want to develop, you do need to set aside some time and dedication to practice. It really is as easy as 1, 2, 3.

The 3 Step Process:

Step 1: Book a complimentary consultation with me (10-20 minutes) to discuss your goals and what you would like your personal yoga practice to look like.

Step 2: Book a 1 hour private yoga session at your home with me. You will learn a personalized yoga sequence that you can practice as often as you want. I will write out the sequence for you with diagrams. I will break down how you can use it for shorter practices if a full hour isn’t an option for a daily practice. How awesome is that? Only 1 private yoga class and you are all set!

Step 3: Dedicate time daily or as many days of the week as you want to practice the sequence I taught you. The more often you practice the better you feel, the more energy you will have and the better you will sleep at night.

yoga sequence

Step 4 (optional) – Book a follow up session. I will go over your sequence with you, check your alignment, answer any questions you might have and help you add to or modify your practice as needed. (Bonus: If you book a follow up session at the same time as your initial session I will include weekly accountability calls (up to 4) to check in and see how your practice is going.)

When we take care of ourselves, we are better able to take care of others and the world becomes a more beautiful place.